Weekly Digital Marketing Q&A – Hump Day Hangouts – Episode 123

By April

Click on the video above to watch Episode 123 of the Semantic Mastery Hump Day Hangouts.

Full timestamps with topics and times can be found at the link above.

The latest upcoming free SEO Q&A Hump Day Hangout can be found at http://semanticmastery.com/humpday.

 

 

Announcement

Marco: I see Bradley. Hey, Bradley. I'm really excited to be here. I'm happy to be here as always.

Adam: Well, we're going to begin. Let's check in with Marco. Marco, how's the weather down there?

Marco: Hey, man. It's beautiful still. It hasn't rain in I can't remember how long. Warm and sunny. Sorry about the snow guys. Wish you were here. Not.

Adam: Yeah, there's a reason I'm wearing a hoodie, and now we've got about 18 or 24 inches. Two feet. Yeah, there's a ton. It's crazy. It's like a blizzard outside. It looks like that wall outside.

Bradley: It's crazy.

Adam: Bradley, how's it going man?

Bradley: I'm good. Cold as hell in Virginia as well. It's like 27 degrees. It's awful. It's been windy all day. It was like 75 degree over the weekend, so it's crazy. Glad to be here. We've got several questions already. What announcements do we have for today?

Adam: Well, we wanted to let everybody know … Actually, I'll let Marco. You want to tell people about the [inaudible 00:01:30] webinar?

Marco: Yeah, I want to tell them about the replay actually. Caesar is working on it. We have a Caesar, so he's getting that done, and once he has it all spliced together, and taken out the technical difficulties and everything that we ran into, we will make it available for 24 hours only. If you miss it after that time, I'm sorry. You can't have it. It's going on pay-per-view, and since it's my webinar, I decide what to charge. I'm sorry but it's not a Semantic Mastery webinar. I did it. It was on my time. It was on my dime, and so I know that we always say membership has it's privileges, but in this case, the privilege was getting all that information for free.

Adam: Got you, and you had to say it, too. The reason there's a reply is because there was that issue. We had some technical issues that were out of our control, so we don't want to penalize people because of that.

Marco: It was going to go on pay-per-view immediately after it was done, but since we had those technical difficulties, we'll replay it for 24 hours exactly. Then that's it. Don't ask for anything else. You're not getting anything else.

Hernan: I like that pay-per-view term. It's like [inaudible 00:02:55] this case is going to be [inaudible 00:02:57] versus the search engine or something like that.

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Bradley: [inaudible 00:03:00] versus Google.

Marco: This is me versus Google.

Chris: The IM world because IM'ers got me pissed man. I'm locked and loaded, and I'm ready for war.

Bradley: There you go.

Adam: Awesome. Well, I'm [crosstalk 00:03:14].

Bradley: I said I'll get Marco a fighting robe and all that shit.

Marco: Oh, yeah. I'll take the bets.

Adam: In some SerpSpace news and some happier news, video powerhouse members got some v-mail prospecting templates to along with the video email prospecting course, which is kind of cool, and then they also got a free customer acquisition funnel last week, which is pretty sweet. If you didn't have … In a powerhouse launch, I'm going to pop a link in here, and it'll be in the show notes. You can check that out if you're interested, if we reopen that up here down the road, and you want to get some pretty sweet bonuses along with, obviously, video powerhouse, which is pretty sweet. Then also, for Surf Space, they're having for three days, you guys can get 15% off any syndication network, and that also includes link building if you order it with the network. It's a pretty sweet deal.

It's pretty rare that SerpSpace gives 15% off on the link building. If you order that all together, it'll be off everything you order right then and there so long as it's a Syndication Network and Link Building. By all means, take advantage of that. We'll email that out to our subscribers and SerpSpace subscribers, so you guys can take advantage of that. That, I believe, is it. Should we get into it?

Bradley: Yeah, sure. Sorry, I had a stupid Windows update this morning. It took almost an hour. It was ridiculous. Now a whole bunch of settings have been updated apparently. I'm getting desktop notifications for every freaking email. It's unbelievable, so I'm a little bit discombobulated, guys. Sorry, forgive me for that. Let me grab the screen and we'll get into it. Can you guys hear me?

Marco: Now we can.

Bradley: Now you can hear me?

Adam: Yep.

Bradley: Okay, what about when I change screens. Can you hear me now?

Adam: Yep.

Best Practices For Link Building And Ordering Services From SERP Space Done For You Links

Bradley: Okay, what a long delay that was. I'm not sure I'm really crazy about this webinar jam platform. It seems like we've been having trouble with it the last couple of webinars, so we might have to discuss that at a later time, guys. Scott Holden is up first. He said, “General question on link building best practices and ordering services from SerpSpace done for your links. When I add links to a local service site, I firstly create my main branded social sites such as GMB, then Google Plus, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and YouTube. Then I build local and national citations keeping my NAP the same as my GMB and AP across all citations. Now I'm ready to add links to anything and everything. In what order would you recommend ordering links from SerpSpace? Would you firstly create a blog on my site, and then set an IFTTT network order for it?” Yes. That's always the first thing that I do, Scott.

In fact, we're actually working on, Hernan has started working on a blueprint or a road map of the process that we use whatever we're launching new properties or new marketing campaigns period. Hernan, you want to chat and talk about that briefly?

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Hernan: Yeah, definitely. We had this upcoming question over and over, and we know that we had this discussion yesterday. We know that's kind of overwhelming if you would because we were putting out content and good stuff pretty much every week or every day [inaudible 00:06:51], so what we are doing is to do kind of a blueprint or a battle plan. The main point is that you have a clear understanding of what you do on site SEO wise, number one. Then depending on what you need for a template, if it's a new site, if it's an H site that needs a bump, if it's a local website, if it's a YouTube video depending on what you need, we're going to lay out a strategy step by step so that you can follow it.

It's basically the strategy that we have been following for our own properties, our own case studies. We have been teaching to [inaudible 00:07:24] members etc. It's going to be pretty cool. I think it's going to take, I don't know, maybe another week or so, but it's going to be ready. It's going to be ready to access, and it's going to be pretty cool.

Bradley: That's great. Is that going to be, just so people know where they're going to be able to find that, is that something that's inside of SerpSpace or is it going to be something that you purchase? How are we going to work that?

Hernan: It think that we're going to work it out in a way that it's a separate product. It's going to be affordable, and we haven't discussed the details yet, but I think it's going to be a separate product, and it's going to be affordable enough so that you can grab it and take it. That's basically how I think it's going to work out.

Bradley: Awesome. Very good, thank you. Scott, that's the reason why I brought that up with Hernan now is because I know that we're working on that. This is a question that comes up a lot. It not only comes up in Hump Day Hangouts, but we get in support a lot as well, so you're not the only one. We're definitely working on trying to provide a better process for people to be able to order services and use basically the same methods we use. That said, the way that I do it, and this is probably going to be unique to each one of us on the team here, but the way that I launch new campaigns when there's a website, especially for local stuff, is I build the site. Do the main social network properties, which you've already done, and then I immediately order an IFTTT network because it takes a few days, a week to ten days or whatever, for me to get it back from the builders. I usually order that while I'm actually setting up the site.

Once the site has been completed, and I get the network back, it's been connected via RSS. Then, I'll end up having at least three posts. That's my bare minimum. I always publish three blog posts to the money site itself, and then that syndicates and basically what I call primes the network. You're putting those initial posts out there, getting some initial back link social signals back to the money site. Then I order the RYS or the drive stack at the same time because that takes a week or so, a week and a half to get back, and while I'm publishing the blog posts. Because I don't usually put out all three blog posts in the same day. I will put them all out in the same week, but I usually stagger like one every other day or something like that when I'm publishing, so that it's not just like boom, three posts out there at once.

While the drive stack is being built, I'm working on syndicating the content to the network, and then I also order the citations package because it's certainly not something that I do, so I order that or outsource that. Then once the three posts have been published, that's about the time that I get the RYS stack back, the drive stack back. Now I have a whole bunch of links. I've got my IFTTT network links. I've got my first batch of citations back from our citation service. Then I also have my drive stack links. Then I end up having pretty much all the links that I need that I want to build additional links to, so that's when I'll go.

After I get that back, then I'll go over to the SerpSpace to the link building packages, and I'll end up submitting all of the URLs from those. Now you don't have to submit all of your URLs. You can hand select a few of them. In which case, I recommend if you're going to do that, like if you want to boost a certain property over others, then you would just filter out the ones that you're not so concerned with. Typically, what I do is boost all of the profile URLs for all of the IFTTT network properties, or I should be saying syndication network properties, because that, to me, is the most efficient. What I mean by that is a lot of times we get the question, and this comes up often as well, should we be building links to the individual post URLs from the web-to properties? Yes, that's super powerful, but it also requires a lot of work because you manually have to go scrap those post URLs whenever you want to start a new link building campaign.

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Whereas if you build links just directly to the homepage, depending on how you have your settings on each one of the properties, especially for the blogs, but for a blogger on Word Press Tumbler, you're going to build links to that homepage, and there will be a number of posts on that page before they start to paginate. Where they go to the archive page or page two or whatever. A lot of times, I'll just build links directly to the homepage URLs or the profile URLs from the syndication networks. That way, when I start to syndicate additional posts … First of all, the three posts that I started with will already be on the homepage, so they're going to benefit from those additional links anyway. Then whenever I go to publish new posts, they're going to automatically be placed on the homepage of the blogs, which means they're going to benefit from all of that inbound link juice to the those syndication network properties.

Does that make sense? We talk about this a lot or we've done this several times in master class, because that's where we do our live case studies and such, so that process has been shown repeated through there both for local sites, and I do the same thing for affiliate sites. It's just as matter of setting up the process and the timing works out to be … It works out well. Do you guys have anything else you do differently?

Hernan: No, we usually take the same approach, Bradley, on that case. The reality is that for example on the IFTTT network, we are stating on one of them. I'm going to give away a little line of the battle plan. One of the things that we were saying is that if your brand, if your IFTTT network is brand new, you can order a small package. If you're pumping an H site, you can kind of order a bigger package. If that's the case, it would be properties RH, etc., but the rest of the mechanics are pretty much the same on my end, too.

Bradley: It's a great question, Scott. In reading the rest of your question, that's exactly the way that I do it. Just to recap from a brand new site is while I'm building the site, I order the network. Just make sure that there's one post in the RSS feed. It can even be the “Hello World” post. It doesn't matter. There just has to be a post present when you order the network or else the RSS feed will throw an error when you try to connect it to IFTTT or when the builders try to connect it and will slow the build process down. My point is, have at least one post in the feed, and it can be the “Hello World” post. That's fine. Then build out the site while the network's being built. When you get the network back to you, then publish. I always do a minimum of three posts, and then I'll order the drive stack at the same time that I get the network back.

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Then once the drive stack gets returned, and also, by the way, at the same time that I order the drive stack, I'll order the citations. Usually, I get the first batch of citations back around the same time that I'll get the drive stack back. Then I'll just go over to SerpSpace and order links for all of those. The first batch of citations, the IFTTT network properties and the drive stacks. That's the way that I do it, and then it's about literally always building more citations if it's for a local business, and continuously publishing content. Keep on it on a good publishing schedule. It's going to vary obviously depending on industry, but it could be one post per week. It could be one post every two weeks. It could be three posts per week. It just depends on your industry and what you think it's going to require.

Then that's what I do is I start publishing posts regularly, and then just start monitoring ranking results, and citations are constantly being built as well, but I'm using a rank tracker all the time, so I'll go in and check on the rank tracking and see where stuff is. I should see movement from publishing posts at that point. If I don't, after a few weeks, and remember. You've got to be careful especially with a new site. You don't want to go too fast, and I noticed you said something about what velocity. As far as building additional links directly to the site, you want to be careful with that. That's why I prefer using the syndication networks and the drive stacks and citations because I build all my links to those instead of directly to the site.

The links that are built directly to the site come from my blog syndication when I'm publishing blog posts and syndicating those out. Everything else, all the external link building is being done to tier one or beyond if that makes sense. The velocity to my actual site is relatively low. The velocity is determined by my frequency of publishing. Does that make sense? It's a great question, though, Scott. Again, that's why Hernan is diligently working on this road map or blueprint or whatever you want to call it. That should be available shortly, and we'll make sure that everybody's aware of how they can get it.

Using Semantic Mastery Syndication Network and Link Building Strategies On A Shopify Store

Jay's up. He says, “Hey, guys. Can I use the syndication network strategies and all of the other link building strategies of Semantic Mastery on a Shopify store?” As far as I know, Jay, you can. I've never done anything with Shopify, so I'm not 100% sure how that works and everything, but I can't imagine why it wouldn't work. Somebody else want to comment on that? Have any of you guys done anything with Shopify? I don't think any of us have really.

Adam: Yeah, it's been a little while though, and while you can't do the sub domain, you should be able to install Word Press in a folder, I thought. I would look into that more either a sub domain or a folder. There's definitely a way to do this. I know stores that did do that. They would use that for their blog for a Shopify store.

Bradley: If you have a custom domain for your Shopify store, then you can absolutely add a blog to a sub domain. All you need to do is map the domain over to Shopify via a DNS service. You can do it in C Panel, but I prefer using something like Cloud Flare or Amazon Route S3. Then you can set the sub domain to point to whatever hosting account you want. You just set an A-record for a sub domain and point to the IP of your host account. That's how you would set up a Word Press blog on a sub domain if you're using a custom domain for a Shopify store.

Adam: Yeah, and just to clear up that last one. You bet you. I'm sorry, I can't see who's asking this, but if they've got an Adam feed, hell yes you can use that to trigger the network.

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Bradley: Yeah, I don't know how the formatting works for publishing posts on a Shopify store. If you have a WYSIWYG editor that you can basically create normal type blog posts with, then yeah. You should be able to use if. If it's an Adam RSS feed, that shouldn't create any problems triggering the applets to work in IFTTT. Yeah, there are two things you can do. One, if you're using a custom domain, you have to map the domain over to the Shopify store anyway. If Shopify hosts your store, and you're using custom domain, you have to be able to map it over there anyway. That's going to be required, so in that case, you could use a third party DNS service and create a sub domain anyway. Just point that to whatever hosting account you want. I like said, you just set an A record with the IP address as the record.

It's very simple to do. However, if you don't and for whatever reason, if your blog function within Shopify doesn't give you the functionality you want, then you could aways create just another website that's used specifically for the blog to promote your Shopify store. That's not the most beneficial way to do it, but it's an alternative that will at least provide some results. It won't be as good, like I said, as being able to have a blog on the same domain. There's no doubt, but if that's all you can do, that's all you can do. It's better than nothing.

Adam: There's a ton of tutorials out there for any of these solutions that we talked about. If you want to use Word Press, just Google how to install Word Press blog on Shopify. If you want to just use theirs and syndicate from that link you put out, then you can do that, too.

Shopify/Amazon Stores

Bradley: Okay, Toby's up. Virginia Surgeons. He says, “In the followup on Jay's question, are any of you geniuses doing any Shopify, Amazon selling or just SEO contracting rank and rent. Thanks, Toby.” I've never done any Shopify, but I'm in the process of starting an Amazon store right now. I've been working on it in my limited free time in the evenings for the last week and a half. I'm actually going to be announcing an Amazon store case study for the Master Mind on Thursday next week. I'm going to be basically announcing that.

I'm getting started on that now. My daughter and I are actually building an Amazon store together, and that's kind of a little side project I'm doing with her. It's funny, but she wants to sell unicorns and fake mustaches, and things like that. She's 11. I say, “Anything I can do to get her involved with my business in any way, shape or form, I'm happy to do it.” I'm going to make the case study part of the Master Mind, so that's something that I'm actually looking forward to doing, because I've never done any e-com stuff before at all. We do more than just rank and rent, Toby. You're thinking about local SEO stuff. We've been doing Amazon case studies, excuse me, not Amazon. Affiliate case studies, and we've done plenty of launched at case studies and everything else.

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The majority of what I've done throughout my career has been local or lead gen or local consulting. That kind of stuff, but I've expanded over the last year a lot. That's a lot less of my business now than it used to be. We try to teach a lot of other stuff outside of just local stuff, guys, and anybody that's in our more advanced groups would know that. Come join us, Toby. That's what I'm trying to say.

Outsourcing Content For A Client Site

Edward is a new Master Mind member. He just joined yesterday. It's awesome, Edward. Thanks and welcome. He says, “I am outsourcing websites. The guy I am using is amazing. The issue I have is having content for him on all pages of a site. How can he get all of it done without spending hours doing each page myself and getting it from the client is impossible. How to outsource this?” Good question, Edward. The best thing that you can possibly do for your business is start hiring writers, interviewing and hiring writers. I would recommend going to Upwork to start.

In fact, Edward, since you are a member of Semantic Mastery, we have a discount for outsource Kingpin available to you. I'm not sure exactly how that works at the moment because we've changed some things recently, but you have at least a discount if nothing else, so we'll make sure you get access to that depending on what it is that we've got to do to get it to you. You should go through that because you can set up an outsource hiring funnel that you can put a couple of writers through. Now you're going to have to pay each writer that you give to put through the process, and give them a small writing task. What I do is I've got writers now because I've screened them and found some really good ones over the last several years that I use now.

What I was trying to say was the best thing that you can do is to hire a writer directly. Not going to a content farm and buying shitty spun articles that are just trash content. That's not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about developing a relationship with a writer that you can contact at any time on an as needed basis, and send work to. That is one of the best things that you can have on your team is a contractor available for writing or multiple contractors. That's what I recommend. Most of the SEO work that I do for my clients on my lead gen sites, guys, is I have curators on staff that curate and publish posts. All the heavy lifting has been done for most of my projects, so it's just a matter of maintaining rankings, which basically is just content marketing.

Because of all the IFTTT work and all the external link building and eveything else that has been done already, it's just a matter of maintaining rankings and that just requires content marketing, so the majority of my SEO business now is really just managing a team of curators. I also have writers. There's a difference between a writer and a curator, but I have several writers that I use for various projects that are outstanding as well. One in the UK. One in Africa, and one here in America in the US. I've got three different writers that I use all the time. All three of them I've been able to hire from Upwork or other outsourcing type sites. I ended up pulling them from those escrow sites and hiring them direct. They work direct for me now on an as needed basis. I just pay them on a per article basis or a press release or per article or per word depending on what the project is.

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I highly recommend that's what you do is start going through, first of all, the outsource Kingpin. I know you've got so much on your plate, Edward, right now, so I recommend going through the Outsource Kingpin product because it will help you to streamline, trying to screen potential writers. It takes a little bit of work to set up, but trust me. It's going to save you so much time compared to what you would spend if you had to screen every single one of the candidates manually. That's what I recommend is you go out and you start looking for your own, and hiring and screening, and then hiring your own writers for your own projects because having somebody that you can contact via Skype or whatever at any time and just submit projects to and have them do it well, it's going to be critical to growing your business. Do you guys have any comments for that?

Hernan: I totally agree with you, Bradley. The fact that there are some services out there, but the reality that the best way to go is to get a writer that you can treat directly with because if you go to a content farm, you will end up screwing up your website getting the index out. That's not worth the trouble, number one. Number two, if you go to a … How would I put it? There are services out there that are really good, but they will charge on top of each article because they have overhead. They have editors. They have a bunch of things, so if you want like a send and forget, and you're willing to pay premium, that's the way to go. Again, I think that a good content writer for whatever you need; press releases, curation, even big time money sites, and big time projects, I think that having a content and paying them well, treating them as well as you would with any other contractor, I think that's golden.

Once you find one, you need to keep them happy because the content writers that really deliver, and they are on time, and they do not disappear as with any other contractor, basically they are really valuable, number one. Outsource Kingpin will help you achieve exactly that. You will be mind blown with the quality of contractor that you can find using that process.

Bradley: Yeah, and how quickly. As Chris says, here is the second part of his comment to you, Edward. You can train the curators. Here's the thing, for pages on a site, guys, I don't recommend curating. It's okay to curate content within a page. There's no doubt, but general for websites for pages, I have original content written. For posts, I always curate because it's so much more efficient. I don't do any of the curating myself now. I've got a team that does it, but curating is so much more efficient for the blog posts, and not only is it efficient, but it responds well. Google responds well to that type of content. For writers, I would recommend hiring writers. For curators, you can hire just virtual assistants that have no writing experience whatsoever. Obviously, they have to … Let me just explain what I mean.

I've got curators in the Philippines that curate on a lot of my lead gen sites, or when I used to do a lot PBN work, which I don't anymore, but when I used to do a lot of that, they would curate on the PBN sites for back links basically, for link building. They'll do a lot of the curated posts for my lead gen sites, and then all of my curators for money sites, for client sites, I end up having native English speaking curators, which again, I've got my three writers that have been trained in curating. What did I do to train them to curate? I put them through Content Kingpin. I'm not kidding.

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My three writers that I just talked about: I've got one in the US, one in the UK, and one in Africa. Those three writers are amazing, but I put them through Content Kingpin to show, it was called Curation Mastery at the time. In fact, it wasn't even a product. I created the product to teach my writers how to curate, and then I created the product out of that training if that makes sense. They do the actual curated posts on the money sites as well. There's a huge difference in how much money you can charge between, for example, having original content written and then having curated content. You can make a hell of a lot more money curating content and paying the curators only a portion of what you charge the client.

For example, if you charge a client, say $35 or $40 per post that you syndicate to their blog or that you publish to their blog, you can pay a curator anywhere $15 or $20 per post. That's on the high end, but as Hernan just mentioned, I always pay my good writers, my good curators top dollar because I want them working for me, and in fact, one of our writers here in the US, her name is Elaine, I've been working with her for over three years now. We give her work all the time. We just sent her another job today for another writing job for a press release. It's crazy, but I've kept some of these writers and curators now for years because they're just really good.

For curating posts, you can charge a client $35 or $40 bucks, and I'm just pulling this number out of the air. I've got a lot of clients like this, but say $35 or $40, and you pay the curator $15 or $20. You make a nice spread, and you don't have to do jack except manage them, which is very easy to do once they get into a routine, and put them through the Content Kingpin course. We have no problem with you sending your virtual assistants that you've hired through the course. We've got no problem with that.

Anyway, that's a whole other stream of revenue in itself, Edward, is content marketing services, and that does not require results based. You can use that in your pitch for the services that it's going to produce results. It's going to help SEO blah, blah, blah, but you can sell just content marketing services alone without even mentioning SEO, and it's an activity based service instead of a results based service. In other words, you get paid just before the publishing of posts whether it produces results or not. If it's part of an SEO package, obviously you're going to want those to produce results, and they usually will if you know what you're doing. Follow our training. You'll be fine. Great question.

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Googlebot Crawl Rate

Dean says, “Does reducing Google Bots crawl rate affect anything negatively. The reason I'm asking is a project I've been working on in the last four months made a jump in serps in January, and the site before that date had 7,000 pages a day crawled, and 600 megabytes of data downloaded. G-Analytics crawl data. Mid January, the crawl pages data downloaded and hosting costs spiked massively to 6,000 pages per day crawled and 3.6 gigabytes of data downloaded, and that's been constant at that new rate since mid January. Traffic's up and hosting costs have hiked massively.”

If that's all bot traffic I wouldn't, Dean. I would limit that. I've never tested reducing bot crawl rate for SEO, like if it's had effect, but I've had reduced crawl rate before because it was slamming the servers. I did that specifically for that reason. Honestly, I never really tested that specifically for SEO purposes. Marco, that's probably up your ally. You got any comment on that?

Marco: No, it's nothing that I've ever tested. I couldn't answer it properly.

Bradley: Okay, Dean, the worst thing that can happen is if you adjust your crawl rate or reduce the crawl rate, and then it affects rankings. You can always bump it back up, but again, if you've got Google hammering your site with that many bots, yeah, it can put a hell of a load on a server. In fact, if you're on a shared server, a lot of the times, you'll end up getting suspended for that. They'll suspend you're posting account for that kind of stuff. I've had it happen many times. A lot of times, it's been just from like PBN sites that for some reason just got a super amount of bots come crawl it for some reason, and it ended up causing … On PBN hosting, that type of stuff is often times really overloaded IPs, so you're sharing with hundreds of other sites. Yeah, if you're paying for the actual bandwidth usage, then I would recommend that you reduce the crawl rate.

Marco: Let me give him a recommendation if he is going to do this. Because if this is definitely G-Analytics crawl data, if he's being crawled by Google rather than other bots. Determine the source of the bots, because a lot of them, you need to block. That's just .htaccess.

Bradley: Spam bots.

Marco: Right, but if he can determine that those are good sources, and you're going to reduce the crawl rate, then I would start small and see if there's anything significant changes, and continue until you see a change in ranking, a negative change. You may not see one. If you do, then you boost it back up because there's no reason. If you're getting good rankings, even if you have a spike in what you're paying for hosting, this is a good thing. Ranking is what you want because that's what brings you traffic. Except that if it's not affective your bottom line. Your bottom line should reflect your rankings increase and your traffic and the money that the website is making. If none of those are happening, then yeah, you have to reduce that so that you reduce costs. Be careful with whatever it is that you decide to do.

Websites With No Meta Titles/Descriptions

Bradley: That's right. Make a small change, and give it a few days. Watch everything and then if nothing negative happened, Dean, go back and reduce the rate a little bit more. Do it just like he said. Do it incrementally. Okay, Michael says, “Does not adding a meta description to a webpage better rank your page? The reason I'm asking is I see a plethora of sites on the first page of Google with no meta description, and it appears that Google displays the appropriate information from the page as it relates to the query. I've tested this a few times, and I have seen the meta description data change. I just want to know if this is something Semantic Mastery has noticed, and if this tactic is affective.”

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Okay, Michael, the official response would be that the meta description shouldn't affect rankings at all. I've played with it though, and what can happen is if the meta description is over optimized, and there's four things that the bot first looks at when it comes to crawl a page, and that's going to be the SEO title, number one. Number two is the URL. Number three is the page title, and number four is the meta description. The page title meaning the H1 tag. Those four things: If you over optimize across those four things, and the meta description being number four, then yes, it can negatively affect rankings. I've seen that. I've tested that, and I've proven that multiple times if you're over optimized across those four. Typically, if you know what you're doing, you're not going to be over optimized across those four in which case the meta description should have no affect on rankings. That's official word from Google.

However, let me explain. I don't go in and optimize meta descriptions until pages start to rank. What I do is I let the SEO plugin display whatever meta description it wants or whatever meta description Google pulls from the page. In other words, I do set a meta description when I set up the pages on site or post or whatever. I don't set that. I just allow whatever Google data to pull from the page that it wants related to the query that the searcher puts in. However, once that page starts to rank, and again, I'm using rank trackers. Once I know that the page has started to rank on first page, and I'm starting to see traffic coming in either through analytics or if I'm looking at search console, whatever, and I'm seeing data where I'm seeing clicks coming through, that's when I'll go in and I'll start optimizing meta descriptions, and I don't optimize for SEO. I optimize for click through rate. Does that make sense?

Guys, your meta description is short. It should be considered a call to action like ad copy. It should be like ad copy. It should be optimized to compel a visitor, a searcher, a Google user, to click your ad, or excuse me, to click your link over the other links that are above it or below it or both because that's basically ad copy. It should be a call to action. It should be very compelling. Whenever I got to optimize meta descriptions, I'm optimizing for conversions or CTA, or excuse me. Click through rate, CTR, not for SEO. Because if you follow the rules, at least what I follow as far as the four things that the bot looks at first when it comes to crawl a page, again, SEO title, URL, page title or H1, and meta description, then you're only going to want to be optimized in any one of those locations preferably the SEO title for your exact match keyword anyway.

The other three areas you can have co-occurring or LSI-type T words in there, but you don't want to stuff because that would be over optimization. Treat your meta description as ad copy, like a small billboard. Use it to write a compelling call to action.

Marco: That's exactly what I tell my coaching students. I'm giving a lot of stuff away that I teach my coaching students. I don't know why because they pay me a lot of money for it. That's an ad. It's like taking an ad out in the newspaper. What do you want that newspaper to say? What is that add that makes it so compelling over any other because you have to remember that everyone is trying to say the same thing. You have to make yours stand out. It's almost like in Ad words you have a lot less space, so you really have to work on that. In the website and in the meta description, you have a lot more space to try to get that person to click over to your website, and it's one of the most important things that you can do is write that really well so the person will focus on it, see it, and want to click and get that trigger finger affect.

Bradley: That's why I don't do that until after the page starts to rank, and I start seeing some, if nothing else, rank. I don't have to start seeing traffic because typically once I see it rank on first page, then I know that it's time to go optimize the description so that I can get the click through rate up. Does that make sense? So the people will choose my link over other links on the same result page. The reason why is because copywriting is not my strong suit. I'm okay at it, but it takes me forever to do any sort of copywriting. Even writing a stupid AdWords ad sometimes takes me 15 minutes, which is like two short lines of text. It's very, very painful for me write a compelling call to action like that. It's just tough for me.

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That's why I always wait until the page ranks to go do it. Because otherwise, if I was trying to optimize the meta descriptions of every page on a site, it would take hours, so I typically will just wait until it start to rank, and then I'll go in and that's my compelling reason for going in and optimizing at that point.

Hernan: Sorry, Bradley. If I can add something, it's that don't worry about it because the shorter the ad, the tougher it is to write compelling ad in I don't know. I think there are like 300 characters or something like that in AdWords. It's crazy. That's number one. Number two, that's why it really pays to ask some entrepreneurs who know about copywriting. I think that it's one of the best skills that we could learn, and one of the things that has been helping me a lot was going through Gary Halbert materials. I've been sharing this with Adam a lot lately. Gary Halbert material, and if you can't writing the ads that you see that they are compelling to you, copying them, and having kind of a side file, and if you see a really good description … You're surfing. You're using Google as a user, then you see, “Okay, why do I click on this specific result and not the other one?”

Take a screenshot and make a side file, and then you will start seeing patterns that will allow you to write better descriptions to your website that entices the click. I think that's valuable, and anyone of us should have some sort of side file or someplace where you can go back and rewrite things so that they are enticing for people to click. I totally agree with Marco. When you are doing AdWords, when you are paying per click, you cannot miss this. You really need to hone in your copywriting skills, but we as SEOs, we take copywriting as a secondary skill and we should be really honing them down.

Bradley: That's interesting because I do a ton of Adword stuff now, and that's something that I've learned to actually use AdWords to help you write your meta descriptions for your pages that your ranking because you can test keywords and ad copy in AdWords adds very easily. As soon as your ad gets approved, which is usually within a couple of hours from the time you submit it to AdWords, it will start sending traffic. As soon as it's approved, it will start sending traffic. If you can get your click through rate up on your AdWords ads, and the only way you do that is through split testing. You constant split test. You always, never stop split testing ads, so you can change the headline or description one or description two or any one of those three, but the point is you always run two ads against each other. Then whatever the better performing ad is after a certain amount of time or a certain amount of clicks, you determine what that threshold is.

Let's say that you allow 50 clicks, and then between those two. Then you determine the winner, and AdWords will tell you which the winner is. Then you pause the underperforming ad, and then write a new add to compete with the ad that was performing better. You do another 50 clicks. You constantly are trying to improve that click through rate. What you'll find is if you're doing both SEO and AdWords for projects, then you can use AdWords to help identify or help to tell you how to write the meta description because you're seeing all the data. You know which meta description or in this case an ad description is producing the highest click through rate. That's the most compelling text or the most compelling copy. You can now add that same copy or a variation of it, something very similar to it, to the meta description of the page that you're also trying to rank for the same keywords. If that make sense.

AdWords will give you the ability to test your meta descriptions and identify or constantly improve your meta descriptions and it's a hell of a lot faster than trying to change a meta description on a page, wait for Google to update the index results because that won't be instantaneous, and then trying to monitor SEO traffic through that and determine if your previous meta description was more compelling than the new one, if that makes sense. It's just as lot faster to test using AdWords is all I'm saying.

Moving Personal YouTube Profile To Brand Account

All right. Moving on. Greg says, “Have you guys used feature much to move a non branded YouTube channel to a branded channel in order to use the ad remove manager feature. Any repercussions on a channel that's got about 13,000 subscribers?” Okay, Greg. I've never done it to move a profile account to a brand account. I've moved one brand account to another, so essentially I've reassigned a brand channel to another Google plus brand page, but I've never done it to a profile to a brand account, so I don't know. What I would suggest doing: I don't think it would affect the 13,000 subscribers, but I don't know that for sure, and I would not recommend testing it with that channel.

What I would do is set up a dummy channel, or excuse me, under one of your personas or just set up a persona. You're talking about using a profile channel instead of a brand channel. Set up a profile, just a dummy profile, create a YouTube channel for that. Then post in the Master Mind, and we'll get a few of us to subscribe to the channel, and then reassign it to a brand page and see if it loses your subscribers. If it does anything to the subscriber count when you go to transfer ownership to the brand page, then you know not to do that. If everything works out okay, then I'd say, go ahead. I don't see why it would be a problem, but I've never actually moved a profile account to a brand account. I've done brand to brand, but never profile to brand. It's just not something that's ever come up for me. Do you guys have any experience on that?

RSS Masher To Merge Feeds

Okay apparently not. Moving on. Let's see. Adam said that we're having a sale for networks and link building, three days only, so go get ‘EM guys. Ken says, “Since Back Link Commando is no longer working, can we use RSS Masher to merge all the feeds, and then how would we be able to scrap all the URLs like we did with Back Link Commando.” Ken, go watch last month's Syndication Academy Update webinar. It's in the member's area. Go check it out. The month of February is the … I believe it was update webinar number nine for February 2017. Go watch that. That has been solved. It's not as automated. It is automated. It takes a little bit of work to set up, but I liked the Back Link Commando process that we had. Unfortunately, that doesn't work anymore. They stopped supporting that plugin, so the work around, which by the way, Rico Suave, he's the one that gave me the idea, and provided that, so I'm going to give him credit.

Embedding iFrame To A WordPress Blog 

All I did was expand on it, and provided training for exactly how to set it up, and that's in the last Syndication Academy Update webinar. “How can I embed an i Frame on a Word Press blog? I've tried in text mode, and Word Press still changes it.” Marco, have you got a comment for that?

Marco: Let me think. Text mode.

Hernan: Can I?

Marco: Go ahead.

Hernan: A [crosstalk 00:47:11] yeah, in text mode, the html code should do it. [inaudible 00:47:18] my experience is that you need to save it while you are in text RHTML mode. Because if you roll back to the [inaudible 00:47:29] maybe it gets trigger out. Depending on if you want to do it on a widget, you can do it HTML directly. If you want to do it on a post, then you go to the text mode, and then you save the post or you publish the post while it is in text mode. Makes sense?

Marco: Let me just add this. YouTube embed code will be changed by Word Press. They will add their own, but I don't see why it would change any other type of i Frame. It's just HTML and you're allowed to go into your WYSIWYG editor as HTML. It could be switching back and forth between HTML and the text. That's when it might get stripped.

Bradley: All right. Here's a plug in that I use whenever I come across shitty Word Press problems that are due to the editor, the text editor or the WYSIWYG editor or whatever. It happens often in Word Press, guys. It is what it is, but use this plugin. A Word Press plugin called RAW HTML. Once you install and activate that plugin, then all you do is wrap whatever text that you don't want Word Press formatting to strip. You wrap them in these tags, these short codes, RAW and then close RAW. That's it. Once you do that, Word Press won't touch anything between those tags or the short codes. Try that and see if that works for you, Ken.

Next, let's see. [crosstalk 00:49:05]

Adam: Real quick. He just posted. Ken was saying he was talking about WordPress.com

Bradley: Oh, hum. I have no idea. I don't know what you can do on that because I know that on self-hosted blogs you can install plugins like RAW HTML, but I know at wordpress.com, you probably can't, so I'm not sure.

Marco: Try going in it to the widget section, and adding it in the text box.

Bradley: Yeah. That's interesting. I don't know what the deal is with that on wordpress.com, Ken. Sorry. I haven't played with that. Okay, so Edward's up. Yeah, Master Mind is next week Edward. It's every other week. Next Thursday is the next scheduled Master Mind.

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Adam: You'll get an email notification.

Bradley: Edward says, “Please explain Hernan's product again. I really have to bring a difficult real estate client to Rank. His competitors have 20,000 links. Help. Not sure where to go for drive stack links. What can I do for him now?” Well, I'll tell you what, Edward. We can give this a lot more attention in Master Mind, so since you're in Master Mind now, if you want to post this question in there, we can start a thread where we can get not only us, but our other members in there to chime in. You'll probably get a hell of a lot more out of it than we could right here now anyway. We can explain a little bit more about what the road map or blueprint that Hernan is working on. That should be available within the next week or two.

In the meantime, just start a thread in Master Mind, and we'll get on it. Okay? Watch out for these fembots. That's awesome. Austin Powers. That's one of my favorite movies. WordPress.com. Thanks, cool. It looks like everybody's wrapped up. That's great. You guys got any other questions, you'd better post them quick because we're going to wrap it up. We've got Syndication Academy Update webinar number ten today. Yes, we have it today. We're going to have that in about five minutes. It will be a short webinar, but I've got some properties I want to share with you guys and a couple of updates, so be there or be square. There is, if you're trying to find out where it's at, go to the Facebook group. Click on the events tab, and you'll see the upcoming event.

Adam: I've got a question for you, Bradley, because you embedded files and folders and everything on a free Word Press blog for SEO Virginia.

Bradley: Yeah, we can go look at it. All I did was just grab the i Frames and put them in there.

Adam: I don't understand why he's [crosstalk 00:51:38]. It could just be the template that he's using, right?

Bradley: Might be. Here we go. Number two. Look at this, guys. This is what I love about this.

Adam: I showed that yesterday.

Bradley: Yeah, so wordpress.com site, and it has zero content except for this right here. This is the only content in this post. Everything else is just embeds, and it's ranked number two for SEO Virginia, and it has been for months. It's awesome. Yeah, all I did was just go into the text editor and just grab the embeds codes for each one of these files, and installed it. It was done on May 16, 2015, so it's been almost two years.

Adam: Ken, I don't know what probably you're running into, but maybe you should change templates, and try that. Just a really simple template. Nothing with all this fancy garbage. Just something really, really simple. [crosstalk 00:52:39]

Bradley: Okay guys. I think that's it. Thanks everybody for being …

Adam: I think Bradley is switching. Yeah, you're back.

Bradley: Thanks everyone for being able to see you in Syndication Academy webinar in just a few minutes.

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